Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

Step 2: Balanced Interpretation After carefully gathering all the data you can f

Step 2: Balanced Interpretation
After carefully gathering all the data you can find in the text, you as a skilled interpreter will articulate the general
principles underlying the text. To identify those principles, the skilled interpreter asks three important questions:
1. What problem or issue does the text address?
Biblical writers did not just deal with problems unique to their times. They addressed timeless issues like money,
power, God, life after death, sex, and family relationships.
BLM 8.4b
2. What light did the text shed on those issues for its original readers?
Remember that in reading the Bible, you are looking over someone’s shoulder. The words on the
page before you were originally intended for another person or persons. You must be careful to discover what
the text would have meant to them in their circumstances before you try to apply those principles to your own
circumstances.
3. What general response does the author describe or imply for the original audience—and for us today?
Step 3: Conscientious Application
Now that you have determined (as much as possible) the meaning for the original audience, you must determine
what that same text means in your own life. Again, the following questions:
What do I have in common with the original audience?
What response did the writer seek from the original audience?
What response does God expect from me?
What am I going to do about it?
This is the bottom line. All the work done so far is futile if you fail at this point. The Scripture can have no place in your
life until it has an impact on the choices you make in everyday life.

Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

This is what each section is asking for. 1. Observation: What does the text say

This is what each section is asking for.
1. Observation: What does the text say?
Remember that not every observation detail will be present in every passage; therefore, feel free to use the
appropriate Bible study tools to carry out this step.
• Context. What is going on in the verses before and after this verse?
• Genre. What kind of writing is this?
• Continuity. What key terms, topics, or themes are repeated or emphasized—in the verse and in the context?
• Proportion. How much space is devoted to each topic in relation to other topics?
• Structural details. How are the ideas connected to one another? What are the relationships among the ideas?
• Grammatical details. How do factors such as sentence type, verb tenses, and modifiers contribute to the meaning
of the text?
• Figures of speech. What figures of speech did the author use, and why?
2. Interpretation: What does the text mean?
• What issues or problems does the text address?
• What meaning did the text have for the original audience?
• What general principles does the author describe or imply for the original audience?
• What principles in the text apply to our situation today?
3. Application: What does the text mean to me?
• What do I have in common with the original audience?
• What response did the author desire from the original audience?
• What response does God expect from me?
• What am I going to do about the truth of this text?
This is an outline of the project
Step 1: Astute Observation
Read the passage of Scripture with a discerning eye, looking for clues to the writer’s intentions. Here are a few of the
things that skilled interpreters are careful to notice:
1. Context: the flow of thought surrounding the passage
• the immediate context of the passage: the verses before and after the passage
• the background and purpose of the whole book (see Luke 1:1–4)
• the historical and cultural context: what was going on in the society of the writer and his audience
2. Genre: the kind of literature, such as narrative, poetry, or epistle
3. Continuity: repetition of key terms or important topics
4. Proportion: how much space is devoted to a certain topic (for example, how much text the Gospel writers devoted
to the last week before the Crucifixion)
5. Structural details: the way ideas are connected in the passage
• rhetorical question
• principle and illustration
• comparison and contrast
6. Grammatical details
• pronoun reference
• sentence type
• phrases and clauses that modify words or other phrases
7. Figures of speech: Which ones did the writer use and why?
metaphor
simile
hyperbole
irony
anthropomorphism
personification
euphemism
Step 2: Balanced Interpretation
After carefully gathering all the data you can find in the text, you as a skilled interpreter will articulate the general
principles underlying the text. To identify those principles, the skilled interpreter asks three important questions:
1. What problem or issue does the text address?
Biblical writers did not just deal with problems unique to their times. They addressed timeless issues like money,
power, God, life after death, sex, and family relationships.
2. What light did the text shed on those issues for its original readers?
Remember that in reading the Bible, you are looking over someone’s shoulder. The words on the
page before you were originally intended for another person or persons. You must be careful to discover what
the text would have meant to them in their circumstances before you try to apply those principles to your own
circumstances.
3. What general response does the author describe or imply for the original audience—and for us today?
Step 3: Conscientious Application
Now that you have determined (as much as possible) the meaning for the original audience, you must determine
what that same text means in your own life. Again, the following questions:
What do I have in common with the original audience?
What response did the writer seek from the original audience?
What response does God expect from me?
What am I going to do about it?
This is the bottom line. All the work done so far is futile if you fail at this point. The Scripture can have no place in your
life until it has an impact on the choices you make in everyday life.

Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

This is what each section is asking for. 1. Observation: What does the text say

This is what each section is asking for.
1. Observation: What does the text say?
Remember that not every observation detail will be present in every passage; therefore, feel free to use the
appropriate Bible study tools to carry out this step.
• Context. What is going on in the verses before and after this verse?
• Genre. What kind of writing is this?
• Continuity. What key terms, topics, or themes are repeated or emphasized—in the verse and in the context?
• Proportion. How much space is devoted to each topic in relation to other topics?
• Structural details. How are the ideas connected to one another? What are the relationships among the ideas?
• Grammatical details. How do factors such as sentence type, verb tenses, and modifiers contribute to the meaning
of the text?
• Figures of speech. What figures of speech did the author use, and why?
2. Interpretation: What does the text mean?
• What issues or problems does the text address?
• What meaning did the text have for the original audience?
• What general principles does the author describe or imply for the original audience?
• What principles in the text apply to our situation today?
3. Application: What does the text mean to me?
• What do I have in common with the original audience?
• What response did the author desire from the original audience?
• What response does God expect from me?
• What am I going to do about the truth of this text?
This is an outline of the project
Step 1: Astute Observation
Read the passage of Scripture with a discerning eye, looking for clues to the writer’s intentions. Here are a few of the
things that skilled interpreters are careful to notice:
1. Context: the flow of thought surrounding the passage
• the immediate context of the passage: the verses before and after the passage
• the background and purpose of the whole book (see Luke 1:1–4)
• the historical and cultural context: what was going on in the society of the writer and his audience
2. Genre: the kind of literature, such as narrative, poetry, or epistle
3. Continuity: repetition of key terms or important topics
4. Proportion: how much space is devoted to a certain topic (for example, how much text the Gospel writers devoted
to the last week before the Crucifixion)
5. Structural details: the way ideas are connected in the passage
• rhetorical question
• principle and illustration
• comparison and contrast
6. Grammatical details
• pronoun reference
• sentence type
• phrases and clauses that modify words or other phrases
7. Figures of speech: Which ones did the writer use and why?
metaphor
simile
hyperbole
irony
anthropomorphism
personification
euphemism
Step 2: Balanced Interpretation
After carefully gathering all the data you can find in the text, you as a skilled interpreter will articulate the general
principles underlying the text. To identify those principles, the skilled interpreter asks three important questions:
1. What problem or issue does the text address?
Biblical writers did not just deal with problems unique to their times. They addressed timeless issues like money,
power, God, life after death, sex, and family relationships.
2. What light did the text shed on those issues for its original readers?
Remember that in reading the Bible, you are looking over someone’s shoulder. The words on the
page before you were originally intended for another person or persons. You must be careful to discover what
the text would have meant to them in their circumstances before you try to apply those principles to your own
circumstances.
3. What general response does the author describe or imply for the original audience—and for us today?
Step 3: Conscientious Application
Now that you have determined (as much as possible) the meaning for the original audience, you must determine
what that same text means in your own life. Again, the following questions:
What do I have in common with the original audience?
What response did the writer seek from the original audience?
What response does God expect from me?
What am I going to do about it?
This is the bottom line. All the work done so far is futile if you fail at this point. The Scripture can have no place in your
life until it has an impact on the choices you make in everyday life.

Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

This is a use your own words based on the chapters type of paper. The professor

This is a use your own words based on the chapters type of paper. The professor was very specific on instructions. Resources are not needed. Please read instructions thoroughly. Let me know if there’s any questions. This paper is for those who is interested in religion because it’s based mostly on own words. I don’t have an opinion really so I’m open to interpretation on your own words.

Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

At the end of the semester you will submit a final reflection (1250-1750 words a

At the end of the semester you will submit a final reflection (1250-1750 words and worth 15% of your total grade). The goal of the reflection is for you to integrate what you have learned over the course of the semester and to explore topics of personal and global relevance (a core goal of General Education classes). The reflection must be written in formal prose with complete paragraphs and an introduction and conclusion. You are welcome to use first person and more informal language in your writing style.
There is no single best way to write your reflection but a few guidelines may prove helpful. This should be personal. It is your exploration and unlike the Text Analyses each week this is your opportunity to personally engage the material – wherever that may lead. You are certainly welcome to talk about your faith (whether any variety of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, Wiccan, Atheist, Agnostic, etc.). Your personal beliefs are likely part of how you encounter these texts and the content of the class. Let me emphasize that this is not graded as any measure of personal commitment to any position of belief (or lack thereof). It is about your personal engagement and critical awareness of what you have learned and how it matters in your life and in the larger world. I am looking for specificity with the texts and ideas that you have encountered and also depth of critical thought and reflection. You can and should include a range of insights you have had over the semester, but please do not write this reflection as a summation of your individual text analyses. Instead the reflection should be an integration and deeper exploration of your thoughts and insights. You hear this from me a lot – but challenge yourselves! Think of it as a chance to show me how much you have learned and how what you have learned matters.
I should also emphasize that you are welcome to be creative. The depth of thought and more formal essay style for this assignment are likely to be challenging but the writing of it should be fun or at least satisfying if you are doing it right. Please make the reflection your own and show me that you have truly made the most of this opportunity to Explore the Bible!!!
I have been uploaded a file that each week i talk about this verses and you can see what kind of verses to talk about

Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

At the end of the semester you will submit a final reflection (1250-1750 words a

At the end of the semester you will submit a final reflection (1250-1750 words and worth 15% of your total grade). The goal of the reflection is for you to integrate what you have learned over the course of the semester and to explore topics of personal and global relevance (a core goal of General Education classes). The reflection must be written in formal prose with complete paragraphs and an introduction and conclusion. You are welcome to use first person and more informal language in your writing style.
There is no single best way to write your reflection but a few guidelines may prove helpful. This should be personal. It is your exploration and unlike the Text Analyses each week this is your opportunity to personally engage the material – wherever that may lead. You are certainly welcome to talk about your faith (whether any variety of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, Wiccan, Atheist, Agnostic, etc.). Your personal beliefs are likely part of how you encounter these texts and the content of the class. Let me emphasize that this is not graded as any measure of personal commitment to any position of belief (or lack thereof). It is about your personal engagement and critical awareness of what you have learned and how it matters in your life and in the larger world. I am looking for specificity with the texts and ideas that you have encountered and also depth of critical thought and reflection. You can and should include a range of insights you have had over the semester, but please do not write this reflection as a summation of your individual text analyses. Instead the reflection should be an integration and deeper exploration of your thoughts and insights. You hear this from me a lot – but challenge yourselves! Think of it as a chance to show me how much you have learned and how what you have learned matters.
I should also emphasize that you are welcome to be creative. The depth of thought and more formal essay style for this assignment are likely to be challenging but the writing of it should be fun or at least satisfying if you are doing it right. Please make the reflection your own and show me that you have truly made the most of this opportunity to Explore the Bible!!!
I have been uploaded a file that each week i talk about this verses and you can see what kind of verses to talk about

Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

Meditation is focusing the mind for a period of time in silence with the aid of

Meditation is focusing the mind for a period of time in silence with the aid of a chosen subject for religious or spiritual purposes or as a method of relaxation.

Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

Meditation is focusing the mind for a period of time in silence with the aid of

Meditation is focusing the mind for a period of time in silence with the aid of a chosen subject for religious or spiritual purposes or as a method of relaxation.

Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

3)read the rest of psalm 139(click on the link below) and comment upon another verse or verses besides the one the mediation focuses upon that stand out for you.

After completing the meditative experience on Psalm 139 found at the beginning of this module, write a  1-2 page reflection paper(minimum three paragraphs) in which you comment upon the following three points:
1) What was this experience of quiet meditation like for you?  Describe your impression of the overall experience in as much detail as possible.
2) What thoughts/feelings came to mind as you meditated upon this verse?  Again,  be as specific and honest as you comfortably can be and don’t worry if what came up for you doesn’t seem directly related to the psalm.
3)Read the rest of Psalm 139(click on the link below) and comment upon another verse or verses besides the one the mediation focuses upon that stand out for you.
Psalm 139

Categories
Religion / Theology : Religion

Be sure to quote from at least one psalm.)

How do you understand the meaning and purpose of prayer? Which type of psalm would be most useful to you at this time and why?  (Be as specific as you can in applying the type of psalm you choose to your life experience and situation. Be sure to quote from at least one psalm.)
Finally, explain why you think that the psalms helped the people of Israel to live in Covenant with God and with one another. (Again, make specific reference to a psalm or psalms in your response.